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Job: Black Mage
Family: Skeleton
Crystal: Earth
Weak against: Fire Trans Fire, Light Trans Light, Blunt
Strong against: Dark Trans Dark, Ice Trans Ice, Piercing

Lich

Lich

Zone Level Drops Steal Spawns Notes
Western Altepa Desert
During: 20:00 - 4:00
49 - 53 6
Respawn: 5 minutes
A, H, HP
??? HP
??? MP
The Eldieme Necropolis 51 - 55 20
Respawn: 5 minutes
A, H, HP
2,300~2,600 HP
??? MP
Sacrarium 54 - 56 12
Respawn: 15 minutes
A, H, HP
??? HP
??? MP
Toraimarai Canal 54 - 57 7
Respawn: 5 minutes
A, H, HP
??? HP
??? MP
Attohwa Chasm
During: 20:00 - 4:00
62 - 64 6
Respawn: 5 minutes
A, H, HP
??? HP
??? MP
The Eldieme Necropolis (S) 66 - 69 41
Respawn: 15 minutes
A, H, HP
??? HP
??? MP
A = Aggressive; NA = Non-Aggresive; L = Links; S = Detects by Sight; H = Detects by Sound;
HP = Detects Low HP; M = Detects Magic; Sc = Follows by Scent; T(S) = True-sight; T(H) = True-hearing
JA = Detects job abilities; WS = Detects weaponskills; Z(D) = Asleep in Daytime; Z(N) = Asleep at Nighttime; A(R) = Aggressive to Reive participants

Historical Background

The Lich as we know it was re-invented by Dungeons and Dragons in the mid '70s, however, the concept existed in folklore under different names and earlier in the 20th century. According to D&D, a Lich is an undead wizard who used black magic or necromancy when living to convert themselves in an undead state so that they may live forever. They are considered powerful magicians since they can develop their skill or craft beyond the normal span of a lifetime.

The term Lich derives from the Old English lych and the German "leiche", which both mean "corpse". In Medieval Roman Catholicism, the lych or lych gate was a covered area at the entrance of a cemetery where a casket would sit waiting for the clergy to arrive to escort it into the cemetery for proper burial. In 1926, there were references to a Lich, primarily as a name for a mummy of a royal figure, only with glowing red eyes and a mouth with two snake fangs (The Abominations of Yondo by Clark Ashton Smith). The concept of a sorcerer who achieves immortality by storing his soul outside of his body exists in other cultures, such as the Koschei of Slavic folklore. It is also thought the Ringwraiths (Nazgul) from J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings were an inspiration for the Lich of D&D.

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